1
$\begingroup$

Hi I am a newbie to the field so please don't mind a rookie question. I have read multiple articles and want to ensure my understanding is correct. I have following two images. In the second image, the object of interest hasn't moved , its just the camera. Is that why its called rotation? How would translation look like in this image? If the floor had moved to other location, would that be called translation?

Lets say there was a dog on the floor and it moved from location A to location B, would that be considered a translation?

enter image description here

enter image description here

$\endgroup$
2
  • 1
    $\begingroup$ I mean, you can just look up these terms in the dictionary. Wikipedia has extensive pages about both rotation and translation. $\endgroup$ Jun 30, 2023 at 22:34
  • $\begingroup$ I’m the images, the camera rotates. If you move the dog you translate the dog, and you might also be rotating the dog at the same time. $\endgroup$ Jun 30, 2023 at 22:36

1 Answer 1

1
$\begingroup$

Homography has an interpretation as a change of perspective or movement of the "camera". I think your example casually refers to the apparent "rotation" of the camera in the homography mapping. However, usually, by rotation, we mean rotating the image around the origin, whereas the translation changes the locations of each pixel by a given direction and distance.

Homography $H(\cdot)$ and rotation (by the rotation matrix) of a "pyramid" $X$ illustrated: enter image description here

$\endgroup$

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service and acknowledge you have read our privacy policy.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.