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Can I use any kind of transform to make spectrogram? If your input signal is a finite length sequence and you want to analyze how the frequency domain components are varying in that input sequence, you have to use one of the techniques used for time-frequency analysis. STFT is one such technique, there are others also like wavelet transform, quadratic time-...


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To answer your question in the context you have asked, you can look at it as follows: You input signal is made up of two discrete-time sinusoids of equal length(5mins) $x_1[n]$ and $x_2[n]$. Supposing sampling rate such that 5mins correspond to $N$ samples and it is well above $400Hz$. So, your input signal will be of length $2N$. Now, N-Point DFT of $x_1[n]$...


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What you exactly you are going to see will depend a lot on the details and not only the overlap. What's your FFT size, what's your hop size, what's your window function, how do the sinusoids line up with the FFT frequency grid, how do changes in the signal line up with the individual frames and how the changes in frequency are actually implemented (i.e. what'...


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I'm just getting into signal processing, mostly through playing with 3D spectrograms. This is a .3 second excerpt of a middle C on piano. The plane facing the screen shows amplitude and frequency (spectrogram), whereas the plane facing left shows the waveform (amplitude and time). I like this method of visualizing sound because it has the best of both worlds....


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Fourier Transform (FT) contains both the amplitude information and phase information. So the FT coefficients are complex numbers. But when you plot the FT results, you and most commercial software just plot the amplitude or the squared amplitude in the graph. Actually there is no nice way to plot the complex numbers in the 2D graph. This might make you ...


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