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Without more details, when a signal is properly recorded at $F_n$ Hz, one is entitled to expect that all information below the half of it, namely $F_n/2$ Hz, can be recovered, somehow. This is an application of the classical Shannon Sampling Theorem. Twice the maximum frequency is sufficient to sample a signal... in theory. The question says: max frequency ...


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I believe you already have two quite nice answers, so I am just gonna add up to those. As you record signals (like Stanley Pawlukiewicz mentioned) you can perform the "beamforming process" after the recording, which is something quite common. As both Stanley and David mentioned you can use delay-and-sum beamformers or some more "advanced" ones (like Capon/...


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Assume first that the medium is homogeneous - this implies that the time delay of arrival between the sensor is constant for all frequencies of interest (over the bandwidth of interest). Now to beamform these signals, you need to implement a true time-delay beamformer. These can be implemented in either the time-domian and frequency domain. A common example ...


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I just looked at the Wikipedia article on beamforming and i can understand your confusion. It ‘s trying to explain too much at once. There are some nomenclature issues as well, MUSIC is a direction finding technique. It doesn’t form beams in the literal sense. Unfortunately a lot of articles as well as books are written by people who understand the ...


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