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you might need some procedure like the prony method to convert your impulse response (as a bandlimited and uniformly-sampled signal) into a sum of decaying exponentials and from that obtain a sum of partial fractions of first and second-order transfer functions, and from that derive poles and zeros. from that can be derived a state-space model.


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can we expect to get 200 times higher amplitude in the output of the filter comapre to the input of the filter Yes. For a sine wave input the amplitude of the steady state output is simply the amplitude of the input multiplied with the magnitude of the transfer function at that frequency.


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These constraints absolutely exist. There are the norm! We could only wish in our wildest dreams to use as wide as bandwidth as we like. There are many areas in a radar system that place limitations on how wide the bandwidth can be and we'll go over a few straight forward ones. Mainly we're talking about limitations due to the antenna and waveguide as well ...


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People working in computer vision/graphics may have very different backgrounds: computer programming, high-performance computing, signal processing, image analysis, optimization, machine learning, etc. Novel contributions can be wide: from a very fast GPU/CPU algorithm to render textures (I had a reference in mind which I can't recall now) to semantic ...


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I'm guessing it's used in the following context. Assuming you have a physical source with some of an amplitude distribution in a plane: you can calculate the polar pattern of that source simply as the Fourier Transform of the amplitude distribution as a function of space (not time!). Fourier Beamforming would be the inverse process: you start with the ...


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Yes and no. There, wasn't that easy? Yes, people do construct models from impulse responses - it's called "system identification". No, not without outside guidance (as, for instance, an idea of the structure of the system). System identification alone will, at best, give you a transfer function, and even then you often need to make educated guesses ...


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The Global System for Mobile Communications (GSM) is a 2G (2nd generation) technology which uses the time division multiple access (TDMA) method. With this method, each phone transmits within its own repeating time slot. During the audio interference in question, the phone's radio transmits over a 888 ms / 1625 = 0.546 ms slot (excluding a guard period) that ...


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