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The second way is how it is done. In the fast-time (or range-bin dimension) you are right to perform the matched filter. However, Doppler information is gathered from sampling pulse-to-pulse. The MTI filter essentially subtracts pulses so that if they have similar phase, or the phase is not changing at all, then there is little to no Doppler being generated ...


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If all you want to do is simply check that the output of the matched filter is correct, do it without noise. The autocorrelation should have a distinct shape that you can look up anywhere online. It is sinc-like and will have a general shape like this The pulse width and the bandwidth of the chirp will change where the nulls are located and the width of the ...


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In the absence of noise, the output of the matched filter is exactly the autocorrelation function of the input signal, delayed in time so that the peak autocorrelation is at the chosen sampling time (cf. the first part of this answer on this forum). I don't recall off the top of my head what the autocorrelation function of a linear FM chirp signal is, but ...


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These constraints absolutely exist. There are the norm! We could only wish in our wildest dreams to use as wide as bandwidth as we like. There are many areas in a radar system that place limitations on how wide the bandwidth can be and we'll go over a few straight forward ones. Mainly we're talking about limitations due to the antenna and waveguide as well ...


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