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In designing such transformations, one should take into account competing interests: fidelity to the human auditory system (that varies with people), including non-linear or even chaotic aspects (tinnitus) easiness of the mathematical formulation for the analysis part possibility to discretize it or allow fast implementations existence of a suitable stable ...


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Well, I don't know whether it'll actually help you – you just said it would! Now, in any case, using an algorithm to extract features from a signal that mimics or resembles human perception should inherently give those feature vectors a higher "mathematical" resemblance when a human would find the original signals similar, too. This is obviously what you ...


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The Equi-loudness contours, chart provided at your link, is for hearing thresholds for isolated tones. Assuming speech is a sum of tones is a wrong assumption. But even if we go ahead with this assumption, it does not help to compute SNR for speech understanding under noise because of the following reasons. a. Speech is a non-stationary signal implying that ...


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A fixed interval corresponds to a fixed ratio of frequencies (at least in equal temperament, which is the most common tuning system in Western music). One octave is a factor of $2$. One semi-tone is a factor of $\sqrt[12]{2}$ because there are $12$ semi-tones in one octave. So one third of an octave (i.e., $4$ semi-tones) corresponds to a factor of $\sqrt[3]{...


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20Vrms is the maximum voltage you can apply across the transmitting transducer without the risk of immediately damaging it. The amplitude of sound it produces is determined by the driving voltage. The transmitter is characterized at 10Vrms, so about 28Vp-p assuming a sine wave, probably where you would prefer to use it for reliability and long life.


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The temporal masking effect is minimal. If your samples do not have extreme differences in loudness, one frame of silence should be enough. Depending on sampling rate one frame is >20ms, that should be plenty.


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Yes, you can calculate it by summing all of the 3rd-octave band pressures. Keep in mind, that if the units are pressure then simple sum and conversion to the decibel scale is enough. However, if you have 3rd-octave band levels, then you have to calculate the anti-log of those values, sum them and then convert back to SPL. Regarding the Sound Exposure Level, ...


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Your method is bad, because it does signal -> FFT -> |·|² -> sum which is, per Parseval's theorem, 100 % identical in information to signal -> |·|² -> sum What you can do is apply weights to different frequency bin magnitude squares of the DFT to represent how "important" they'd be for perception. If you did a weighted thing, you'd be closer to ...


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The Mel is an empirical model that describes the change in human pitch perception at different frequencies: until 1 kHz we perceive pitch changes in a linear way, after that, we perceive it in a logarithmic way, just as you said. The pitch function relating real and perceived pitch differences is approximated based on the measurements made by Stevens in ...


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I just glanced at a paper on this subject, and it appears that you should be introducing an inter-aural 0-to-2PI phase shift over a very narrow frequency range, rather than offsetting one signal by T. I can imagine a variety of ways to create the phase-modified noise signal, included filtering a noise signal with a high-Q 2nd-order allpass filter, or by ...


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Question 1: The equations (6.7), (6.8), and (6.9) are all consistent, so I suggest that the wording for the definition of $g$ is incorrect in the book. Question 2: The brain just hears the time difference and, by experience, can figure out what that means in terms of distance. So the brain has effectively "calibrated" for whatever the usual speed of sound ...


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The Fastl-Zwicker book is usually the introduction to this topic. The more I learn about it the more fascinating it becomes. If you pick it up used be sure to get one with the CD examples in it, as they are completely fascinating.


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i dunno anything about EAQUAL or PEAQ. judging which sounds better is quite subjective, so much so that i consider it nearly a useless question. but if you have a reference (that you define as "good"), and you have several options to compare to the reference, and your goal is find which option most sounds like the reference, then i would recommend AB ...


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