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Does mixing brown noise and white noise create pink noise? No. Pink noise has a spectrum of that falls with 3dB/octave (or 10dB/decade). The spectrum of the sum of white and brown noise will be "brown" at low frequencies and "white" at high frequencies. The spectrum will have two slopes: below the transition frequency it will be -6dB/octave and above it, ...


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So, it's generally right that a receiver adds noise due to physics (Johnson-Nyquist noise). So, yes, in any system, at least part of the noise in the received signal is caused by the receiver. There's also noise that is background noise from e.g. cosmic sources that happen neither in the receiver nor the transmitter (and also aren't other transmitters ...


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Usually, there are two types of noise that you can eliminate by using the spectrum. One type is a noise that is in a different frequency band than the signal (it can be a high-frequency noise). In such a case, there is a clear separation between the signal content and the noise in the spectrum and you have to do nothing. The second case is when the noise ...


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Okay, when discussing white noise or pink noise (or red noise or brown noise or flicker) or some other random process, there is this property called the power spectrum, in which white noise has a constant value for all frequencies. But we integrate the power spectrum over all frequencies (from $-\infty$ to $+\infty$) to get power. Integrating a constant, ...


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