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The key to understanding what inserting zeros does is to understand two things: what samples represent in the time domain (because we want to insert zeros in the time domain), and what they represent in the frequency domain (because we want to know what it did to the spectrum). First, sampling is a modulation (PCM—Pulse Code Modulation), equivalent to ...


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What you define as oversampling is actually sequence expansion by zero stuffing in between its samples. Which is an operation performed as a prerequisite of interpolation. And yes; zero stuffing a sequence will alter its spectrum as explained by DanBoschen. Oversampling implies an ADC operation in which a signal is sampled above its Nyquist rate. This ...


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Yes inserting zeros does insert new frequencies in the unique digital spectrum that extends from $0$ to $2\pi$ radians/sample or equivalently $\pm \pi$ radians/sample corresponding to $\pm F_s/2$ where $F_s$ is the sampling rate. The easiest way to see this intuitively is to consider a DC signal represented by a stream of constants, such as: $x_1 = \begin{...


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Interpolation by avaraging does introduce new frequencies as it doesn't reproduce the signal assumed to be the original one. The correct way to interpolate the new values is the Shannon interpolation. Ps: This method is equally correct in the time and frequency domains.


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none of them are showing WHAT TO DO AFTER I PERFORM DTW!. There are two quotes, at least in the page that you have linked that hint at what you do next, these are: "We assume that you are familiar with the algorithm and focus on the application. Further information about the algorithm can be found in the literature..." The linked reference is not a bad ...


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If I have an output from band-pass filter and want to convert it back to time domain. Is it also the correct approach to cyclic shift to left and pad zeros in the middle before applying windowing and convert back to time-domain?


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So, imagining a sample set of size 10 and if you want to upsample it to 15, you can upsample it by 3 and downsample it by 2, correct? Sort of. You need to upsample, low-pass filter in the up-sampled domain and then down sample. If that is true, does one can create a kernel by merging the two kernels the upsampling and downsampling ones? That's an odd ...


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