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I am using this link for getting the reference by Richard Balmer : There are no references 30 and 32


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When I read «bilinear interpolation kernel» in image processing, I assume that they mean bilinear image imterpolation: y(n+t) = (t-1)x(n) + tx(n+1) If you decide upon a fixed uniform upsampling factor and standard dsp «zero-fill then lowpass filter» upsampling, the convolution kernel turns out to be samples of a triangular waveform. -k


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One more possibility, if you have a lot more and longer training data than production data. Attempt to train a machine learning model (DNN, etc.) against shorter segments of the test data to predict the interpolated values in regions where Sinc interpolation alone is too inaccurate. Use data from longer segmenting to validate during training. If you don'...


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One possibility is to use a "discrete sinc interpolation", which uses a compact support version of a sinc (which is not a truncated sinc). Otherwise there are methods based on the discrete cosine transform (DCT) and discrete sine transform (DST). Another interesting approach is based on "sinc-lets". These are reviewed in this paper. In particular, look at ...


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A bandlimited signal is infinite in duration. Even a low pass filtered signal for anti-aliasing implies a long duration. So if you don’t have signals off the ends, try generating them. Add a Monte Carlo shotgun of points to each end generated using anything known about the legal distribution of the signal. Reject the random end extension points that ...


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I think I have the gist of what you are asking, but I am clarifying to make sure. Short answer: Yes, using a DFT. You just have to compensate (select) the correct alias. The assumption is that your signal is a periodic one. Also that when you say "band limited", but the fundamental won't suffice, the signal is composed of the fundamental and a few ...


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I have some very short signals in the range of 8 to 16 samples. These represent a bandlimited signal, sampled at or slightly above the Nyquist rate. Nope. A signal can't be limited in time and in frequency at the same time. If it's very short, than chances are the bandwidth is a lot higher than you think it is and that you've already picked up some ...


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