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6

High-capacity tape formats use helical scanning. Here I look at why that gives a higher capacity than linear recording with four tracks (one stereo track on each side) like in a compact cassette (C-cassette). Figure 1. Stereo C-cassette player/recorder linear head (left) and a helical scanning head from a data drive (right), same scale. There is a too-short-...


1

In my workplace, with huge datasets, tapes are still in use for long term backup. Namely, one often uses Data8, a 8 mm Backup Format pionnered by Exabyte corporation. Some history on tape formats: Much Ado About Exabyte/8mm Tape Drives.


4

You have already selected your answer, but I would like to put a few more lines. First of all, objecting to Marcus, I think that your first assumption is correct! We can store one hour of almost CD quality (14-16-bits, 44100Hz, stereo) analog audio into these commercial music casettes; i.e magnetic reels. So on a very rough basis you have almost a 600 MB (...


4

Typical cheap cassette tape recorders and players in the 1970's used audio circuitry that did not have a completely flat frequency response and added a lot of phase distortion (mostly inaudible to most consumers). In addition, the computers did not use high sample rate low quantization DACS and ADCs (which cost a fortune back then), sometimes only a simple ...


43

I had heard that tape is still the best medium for storing large amounts of data. well, "best" is always a reduction to a single set of optimization parameters (e.g. cost per bit, durability, ...) and isn't ever "universally true". I can see, for example, that "large" is already a relative term, and for a small office, the ...


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