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4

This looks like what pretty "classical" video compression does when facing severe data loss – notice the very MPEG-typical square blocks, and how some of the probably more changing blocks are getting "updates" in your still? That's because, although the last reference frame was lost, the decoder tries its best to reconstruct an image ...


2

Is it correct that the frequency resolution is dependent on the length of the window? yes. and how does the overlap then affects this. The higher the overlap the more information is "repeated" from frame to frame. Consecutive frames are not independent but become more and more the same as the overlap increases. Assume I have a very large window ...


2

Overlap is and isn't related to time resolution: in sense of the uncertainty principle, only the window width plays a role. However, any overlap other than maximum (hop_size = len(window) - 1) will alias the STFT and lose analysis information: this loss is for both time and frequency. Depending on hop_size, only a part of STFT is affected, however (see ...


1

You are right, reducing increasing the overlap you increase the time resolution, and increasing the duration you increase the frequency resolution. You can increase the resolution as much as you can, by increasing the overlap, what you can't do is to observe fast variations in frequency. Think of each frequency bin as a moving average, sudden variations of ...


0

Spectrograms will work with any network that can operate on images. A spectrogram, however, is not an image, and many image techniques will be inapplicable: Data augmentation via rotation: a rotated spectrogram doesn't represent the same process at all, or even any process (there may not be a signal that maps to a given 2D array). Some networks are tailored ...


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