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The typical practice with decibels is to append the unit. Unfortunately, it's informal, so you'll see things like "dBm" in RF circuits which refers to "dB with a reference of 1mW", not "dB with a reference of 1 meter". you could: Put a note in your graph that $0\mathrm{dB} = \mathrm{1 m/s^2}$ Use "dBg" (and use 1g as your reference) Just keep the y-axis ...


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How exactly do you calculate the bandwidth? You don't need to. The signal has finite length and hence the bandwidth is unlimited. There are also steps in there. These also requires infinite bandwidth. I do, however, not know how to calculate said distribution. the function consists of six individual line segments. You probably should calculate the ...


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The concept of the bandwidth has several definitions. For simple filters, one definition of bandwidth is the -3 dB frequency (for a lowpass filter) $f_c$ where the filter gain at $f_c$ is $H(f_c) = H(0)/\sqrt(2)$; i.e. $f_c$ is the half-power or cut-off frequency. This definition could be applied for a bandpass filters too but not for highpass filters. Note ...


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If the signal is complex, the theoretical unique maximum bandwidth of the DFT process is $f_s$ and if the signal is real this would be $f_s/2$. However if you processed your signal to remove its DC offset (rather than it being a sampled zero-mean signal) then this is a high pass filter which will reduce the theoretical bandwidth of the composite DC removal ...


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This question seems to highlight some of the perils of translating concepts between the continuous domain and a discrete one. My understanding is that bandwidth is defined in the continuous domain as the difference between the upper and lower band limits. Since it is the interval length, whether the interval is open or closed doesn't matter. Open or ...


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