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For traditional signal processing, time and frequency are dual variables, linked through Fourier transformations. This strong linkage yields a balance, sometimes called Heisenberg–Pauli–Weyl uncertainty inequalities. In everyday words, one could not be arbitrarily precise in time location and frequency determination. One cannot determine the frequency of a ...


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Yes. You can choose the µ parameter freely in µ-law encoding. So, there's as many different µ-law encodings as there are possible µ; of course, only very few are standardized. The same applies to the A in A-law. You might want to read the wikipedia articles on µ-law and A-law, instead of just the G.711 article.


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I remember how much of an eye opener it was too learn about Hilbert Transforms (HT) and "instantaneous frequencies". I'd ask very experienced engineers about "instantaneous frequency" and they would say it is impossible. But then they'd agree changing frequency over time is at the heart of FM radio. Empirical Modal Decomposition (EMD) breaks down a ...


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If you have your signal collected during a long duration and you want to study its spectrum variation with time. You plot the spectrogram of the signal. That gives you a measure of changing frequency content of your signal with changing time. So, you can plot the amplitude as color intensity with frequency on the y-axis and time on the x-axis to visualize ...


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What is the best practice (and code solution) for detecting the onset of an impulse? ... The waveforms for these pulses do not necessarily go to zero between impulses, in fact, they rarely do. The signal goes close to zero, but not precisely. (I expect this has something to do with ambient noise around the signal, but am not certain . . .) Both of these ...


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The culprit is the ADC. Some TI (Burr-Brown) ADCs have this kind of problems.


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