We’re rewarding the question askers & reputations are being recalculated! Read more.

New answers tagged

0

For small angles (see further explanation at end for further details on small angle approximation) the sidebands for phase modulation are closely related to the sidebands for amplitude modulation as revealed in the IQ phasor diagrams below. Both diagrams show large carrier AM and PM modulation being modulated by a single sinusoidal tone, resulting in two ...


0

Theoretically, yes. In the worst case, make your prototype wave in digital-land using whatever method you want. Then if your signal is $x(t)$ just calculate phase and magnitude: $\phi(t) = \arg \left (x(t) \right)$ and $m(t) = \left | x(t) \right |$. Your biggest difficulty is there could be signals (e.g. if you have just two tones beating against each ...


0

If I understand correctly, you want to use each side band as an independent information-bearing signal. In other words, you want to be able to generate $$a_k e^{2\pi f_i t}$$ with the information in carried by the amplitude $a_k$. There are several ways to do this, but I don't know which are feasible using optical processing. All of the following methods are ...


Top 50 recent answers are included