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2
votes
To expand on Dilip's comment: The noise being white implies only a certain property of the noise itself, not its correlation with any other signal. In digital communications, the independence and/or …
answered Dec 7 '14 by MBaz
2
votes
I'll assume AM DSB modulation for simplicity, but the same idea applies to quadrature modulation. I'll assume that the received signal has been properly bandpass filtered. I'll also ignore noise and c …
answered Nov 14 '18 by MBaz
1
vote
The usual scenario is where you want to find if the received signal is noise: $$r(t)=n(t),$$ or if it is a signal plus noise: $$r(t)=s(t)+n(t).$$ It is generally assumed that you know $s(t)$. For exam …
answered Aug 4 '17 by MBaz
2
votes
This channel model is known as a multiplicative channel, and it differs from the AWGN channel in that the signal amplitude is scaled by a gain factor. If the gain factor is real (that is, if the chan …
answered Jan 13 '17 by MBaz
5
votes
There are many factors involved in understanding the theoretical limits to communication. What follows is just a brief introduction that only scratches the surface. First, let's consider a simple sce …
answered Mar 26 '15 by MBaz
4
votes
I think the problem is not as bad as you suspect it is. I wasn't around at the time, but from what I've read, early radar systems essentially connected the matched filter's output to an oscilloscope, …
answered May 11 '15 by MBaz
3
votes
As Conrad pointed out, a correlator is probably your best bet. The correlation of a signal with itself (also known as its self-similarity) is larger than its correlation with any other signal (except …
answered Feb 2 '15 by MBaz
24
votes
In signal processing, two problems are common: What is the output of this filter when its input is $x(t)$? The answer is given by $x(t)\ast h(t)$, where $h(t)$ is a signal called the "impulse respon …
answered Dec 2 '15 by MBaz
0
votes
It looks like you have calculated $$\frac{S+N}{N}=3.47$$ (The output of snr is in dB). This means that $\frac{S}{N}=2.47$. I have assumed that the power of the signal plus noise is equal to the power …
answered May 12 '15 by MBaz
3
votes
Yes, it is possible (at least on paper or code, since complex signal don't exist physically) to apply a matched filter to complex signals. This is one way to look at it that I think is illustrative. …
answered Apr 7 '16 by MBaz