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Does anyone know how to detect and quantify a digitally time stretched audio signal when made back to tape?

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  • $\begingroup$ You could perhaps try and use a phase vocoder which might reveal some noticeable artifacts. Also it's highly unlikely that the effects of quantization would be preserved on tape (an analog medium). $\endgroup$ Commented Sep 7, 2023 at 0:55
  • $\begingroup$ If you don't have the original to compare to, and if the time-stretching product is really good (like Melodyne or Serato or SoundToys SPEED), it's gonna be real hard to tell it was stretched. (I presume you mean time-scaled without changing pitch.) A time-domain time stretcher will have artifacts for note onsets and dissonant chords or many instruments playing many notes simultaniously. $\endgroup$ Commented Sep 7, 2023 at 2:39
  • $\begingroup$ What does "quantization of the signal" mean in the context of this question? $\endgroup$ Commented Sep 7, 2023 at 2:45
  • $\begingroup$ > If you don't have the original to compare to, and if the time-stretching product is really good (like Melodyne or Serato or SoundToys SPEED), it's gonna be real hard to tell it was stretched. (I presume you mean time-scaled without changing pitch.) A time-domain time stretcher will have artifacts for note onsets and dissonant chords or many instruments playing many notes simultaniously. The time-stretching was most probably done in Pro-tools, and the tapes contain speech not music. And yes, I mean time-scaled without pitch change. > What does "quantization of the signal" mean in the context $\endgroup$
    – Audiser
    Commented Sep 7, 2023 at 14:36

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