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Typically the phrase "time domain" implies an analog signal x(t), but I've also seen it referring to a digital signal x[n]. Is there any phrase that refers to x[n], but not x(t)?

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  • $\begingroup$ discrete-time domain signals, $x[n],X[k]$ etc., are referred to as sequences... $\endgroup$
    – Fat32
    Apr 24 at 15:16
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    $\begingroup$ If you want to be accurate: "digital" refers to a signal whose amplitudes are restricted to a finite set. "Digital" is not related to the properties of the signal's time domain. $\endgroup$
    – MBaz
    Apr 24 at 15:53
  • $\begingroup$ You are correct, in this case I'm referring to discrete digital signals vs. continuous analog signals. $\endgroup$ Apr 24 at 17:29
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I use sampled-time domain or discrete-time domain. I think I've heard other people use other terms, so they can chime in (discretely).

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    $\begingroup$ I use "discrete-time domain" and "discrete-time signals". $\endgroup$
    – MBaz
    Apr 24 at 15:50
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    $\begingroup$ Can I chime in continuously? Curious minds want to know. ;-) $\endgroup$
    – Peter K.
    Apr 24 at 16:22
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    $\begingroup$ He types in, digitally. $\endgroup$
    – TimWescott
    Apr 24 at 16:26

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