2
$\begingroup$

In papers and textbooks and on Wikipedia, I regularly stumble upon so-called "lattice filters". They always look horribly more complex than their 'non-lattice counterpart' and I usually don't really understand what's going on (and why). I could not really find a useful introduction to lattice filters and the fundamental idea behind them. What I believe to have understood (please correct me if I'm wrong) is that they represent some form of very efficient implementation scheme for classical filters, e.g., RLS?

Can somebody explain the intuition behind lattice filters? What are they, which problem do they solve, and how do they solve it? References to readable introductions are also highly appreciated.

(Note that I have actually had a fair amount of DSP in my undergrad studies, but lattice filters were never even mentioned.)

$\endgroup$
2
  • 1
    $\begingroup$ Do you have Oppenheim and Schafer, Discrete-Time Signal Processing? $\endgroup$ Apr 21 at 18:32
  • 1
    $\begingroup$ Thanks, those are both very helpful suggestions! After skimming the relevant chapter (Structures for Discrete-Time Systems) of Oppenheim / Schafer, I now have at least a rough understanding of what's going on. It's interesting to note that Oppenheim / Schafer mostly emphasize the increased numerical precision, whereas one important claim on the RLS wiki page is that the lattice algorithm has lower computational complexity. That result may be very specific for the RLS lattice algorithm that is mentioned there, though. $\endgroup$
    – jhin
    Apr 23 at 10:55
0
$\begingroup$

The intuition behind lattice filters probably is connected with the propagation of waves and modeling wave propagation with discrete cells.

$\endgroup$

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.