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We have TI 6713 dsp kits in our Lab but since those kits are very old(They were started/released near 2000) we are now considering to get new dsp kits ,so our under grad students may clear their hardware concepts related to dsp in a better way

I have seen a question on DSP SE that is some how relevant and especially the answer of Hilmar there.

But am i bit confused?

Is it okay to use kits like Rasberry PI or Aurdino,for teaching dsp Lab to under grad students?especially as alternative option to dsp kits of TI or Analog devices

If possible,Please also recommend other hardware options

Link of relevant question

Hardware kits for DSP Lab?

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  • $\begingroup$ Pure DSP processors are an endangered species nowadays. The trend goes to integrated SoCs with co-processors. Take a look at TI's Sitara platform, especially the AM572x SoCs. They offer ARM cores in addition to high speed DSP cores and real-time communication subsystems. Development can be done either RTOS-based, on bare-metal or with an SDK under a fully loaded Linux distribution running on the ARM cores. You can also use special real-time systems like Xenomai or virtualization to split the system into a Linux and a bare-metal / RTOS component. $\endgroup$
    – Jazzmaniac
    Apr 6, 2021 at 13:35
  • $\begingroup$ The Beaglebone open hardware project has two boards with the AM572x: The Beagleboard X15 and the Beaglebone AI. The older Beaglebone black runs on a similar but less powerful SoC and is the heart of the Bela project (bela.io) that gives you very quick access to very low latency embedded audio DSP programming. And Beaglebones come with great documentation, which makes them very suitable for student labs. $\endgroup$
    – Jazzmaniac
    Apr 7, 2021 at 8:37

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I think using a Raspberry PI or Arduino (without ADCs or DACs) has no advantage over using just a PC with Matlab or Python. The thing that separates DSP hardware from "normal" processors is that they can do certain operations very fast and/or in parallel. If you want to do something cool, I would use a FPGA with ADCs and DACs like the Red Pitaya for lab experiments.

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The post by Hilmar is exactly what I would recommend. What he's getting at is what you intend to teach.

If you're aim is to just teach the theory of digital signal processing, it's pretty hard to beat using a PC with MATLAB, Octave, or even Python. Using this kind of software is straightforward and allows you to explore the theory behind what is being taught with little to no barriers. If you were to introduce specific hardware, then you would quickly go out of scope of what you're trying to teach.

Involving embedded systems like dedicated DSP boards or more generic boards like Raspberry Pi now introduce the mechanics on how you implement DSP functions. Learning how to use development environments, such as Xilinx's Vivado or Altera's (now Intel's) Quartus, can be a course on its own. Throw on top that practical implementation of DSP algorithms required knowledge of HDL languages and C/C++, and you'll find yourself teaching an entirely different course from that of one that wants to teach theory.

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