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Where does $1$ come from, like from $-N$ to $N$ is $2N$ so why is $2N+1$?

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    $\begingroup$ -N to -1 is N, 1 to N is N, then you need to count the 0 index so all together it’s 2N+1. Just choose an N, write the numbers -N to N down, and count how many you have. $\endgroup$ – Engineer Nov 17 '20 at 22:05
  • $\begingroup$ yes i got the idea thank you $\endgroup$ – sumer fattoum Jan 12 at 21:33
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Isn't $-N$ to $N$ $2N+1$ index in total (you probably missed the 0 here)

$$ P = \lim_{N\to\infty} {\frac{1}{2N+1} \sum_{n=-N}^N} \lvert x[n] \rvert^2 $$

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