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The channel is given to have these characteristics, and its required to study the affect on Frequency Modulated signal and its demodulation.
Since there are no sharp corners (like during clipping) will there be a significant difference in the frequencies? Can a regular high-pass filter be used still to demodulate the FM signal.

enter image description here

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  • $\begingroup$ Hi Tanya- What is the purpose of your question (this looks like a homework problem, so getting the context---we don't bypass the benefit and purpose of homework but we can certainly help you with where your stuck) $\endgroup$ – Dan Boschen Jul 29 '20 at 2:54
  • $\begingroup$ Yes it was part of additional problems to think on. But I am not familiar with non-linear transformations hence asked here. $\endgroup$ – Tanya Choudhary Jul 29 '20 at 3:56
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I think this will help you: Think about how the "frequency" is given by the zero crossings of the waveform, and then ask if the transfer function you show (and for that matter even if it did have sharp corners and clipping), would that have any effect possibly on the zero-crossings? Can we determine the frequency completely and accurately from the zero crossings for a real waveform?

Also consider this: All noise can be decomposed into AM and PM components, meaning Amplitude modulation and Phase Modulation. (Frequency Modulation and Phase Modulation are similar: If you have FM then you have PM since they are related by an integral-- a change in phase over time is Frequency). So if you have a signal that has AM and FM components, and you hard limit it, you remove all the AM components and you would only be left with FM. Here is the thing to think about then: What if you have a FM signal and hard limit it (which is the sharp corners and clipping you mention)-- it would remove AM if it existed, but how would it effect the FM?

For more mathematical thoroughness, explore how ANY pattern that repeats in time over period T can exist in frequency only at frequency n/T for n as the set of all integers. Would the transfer function from x to y that you show possibly change T for any given waveform that repeats over T?

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