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When do we use time domain analysis and when do we use frequency domain analysis?

As far i studied i know that when we need to study individual sinusoidal components of a signal, we choose frequency domain analysis. Is it the only application of frequency domain analysis?

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  • $\begingroup$ This is far too broad, and also lacks any self-reflection: Man, you've asked multiple questions that touch either and even both domains. It's just, again, as if you're asking us to write your essay. $\endgroup$ – Marcus Müller Jun 5 '20 at 12:34
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    $\begingroup$ This will come with experience! It's an art as much as it's science $\endgroup$ – Dsp guy sam Jun 5 '20 at 12:36
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Frequency domain analysis has much broader application (more numerous to list) than just analyzing sinusoidal components of a signal. Frequency domain analysis appears as a mathematical tool whenever the equivalent operations in the time domain can be simplified, and vice versa. For example, convolution in one domain is multiplication in the other which can simplify many problems. Further given the great efficiency of the FFT to solve the Discrete Fourier Transform, it has found its way into so many applications where the end result can be viewed as simplifying the number of operations needed to solve for a result (such as radar imaging, autofocus, and highly efficient communications). The broader class of the Laplace Transform is also the frequency domain and is used to convert difficult integro-differential equations to simple algebra!

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  • $\begingroup$ In your last few lines,you say that laplace transform is part of frequency domain analysis? If that is the case,what about z transform? Is z transform also part of frequency domain analysis? $\endgroup$ – Man Jun 5 '20 at 15:50
  • $\begingroup$ Yes z transform for discrete systems and Laplace for continuous $\endgroup$ – Dan Boschen Jun 5 '20 at 22:27

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