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The attached article talks about hue,saturation and intensity images. Where is each of them in fig6.25 ? I know that fig(b) shows Hue image but where are other two(saturation and intensity images)

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When the text refers to Hue component image, it is to represent what hue value these colors hold, not an actual picture in the text. When the text says H is shown in figure b, it means the numerical representation of these three colors (or hue) are illustrated more clearly when we take away saturation.

That being said, the saturation for all four figures (a to d) is being held constant as well. Figures a and d having high saturation, while figures b and c have no saturation. So I wouldn't say any of these figures are a Saturation image, by the definition you might be looking for. To make that picture you would need a square of a single color (Hue) and then change the saturation of each of the four corner squares.

Likewise, all of these figures have constant intensity in each corner. So I wouldn't say any of these are Intensity images either.

All of these figures have "component images" in them: H, S, and I.

Figure a and b illustrate the effects of changing Hue on an image with static saturation and intensity, while figure c and d show what happens when you "blur" (taking color averages over small portions of the image) the first two figures.

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  • $\begingroup$ at the top of text,it is written: " Assume that the component image values of the HSI image are in the range [0,1]. " What does this mean?? Hue,saturation and intensity images,all will have value between 0 and 1?? $\endgroup$ – engr May 14 at 12:31
  • $\begingroup$ in your answer in 2nd para,you wrote : "the saturation for all four figures (a to d) is being held constant" How do you come to this conclusion? $\endgroup$ – engr May 14 at 12:33
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    $\begingroup$ Any color is going to have three components to it: H, S, and I. We can measure these components and they will always have a maximum and minimum value. So, if we were to normalize each of those component values, they would have a range of 0 (the minimum) to 1 (the maximum) $\endgroup$ – Jake May 14 at 18:11
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    $\begingroup$ If any of the pictures didn't have constant saturation then some of the image would be a muted gray, some of the image would be a vibrate color, and some of the image would be something in between $\endgroup$ – Jake May 14 at 18:12
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    $\begingroup$ The two statements do not contradict. All of the pictures have H, S, and I components in them. Two of them have a high S values, the ones that aren't gray, and the other two have low (potentially S = 0) S values. I will note that an S value of 0 still makes it a component of the image. "Not having an S value" and "having an S value of 0" are not the same statement. $\endgroup$ – Jake May 14 at 18:16

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