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I used matlab for my projects but wondering is there any framework similar but easier than matlab.

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    $\begingroup$ there's no obviously "best" language for anything – you're just asking for opinions, and that works well on a discussion board, but not on a Q&A site like this. For that very reason, opinion-asking questions are explicitly off-topic here. $\endgroup$ – Marcus Müller May 3 '20 at 12:34
  • $\begingroup$ I'm not sure what you mean "easier than matlab". Most real programming languages are lower level than Matlab, and in that sense probably more difficult. $\endgroup$ – Matt L. May 3 '20 at 12:53
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Most image processing code in image signal processors (ISP) in the industry are written in C++ and assembly, which I would say have more syntax and language gibberish than MATLAB.

So if you are considering to write code for educational purposes than MATLAB and python have good libraries and easier to code.

Else if you are writing code to be run on real HW, C++ and assembly mostly.

Open CV is a good cross platform library with C++ and other languages supported as well

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This question is equivalent to "what is the best car to drive?" without consideration of where you are or what your life is like. Your "best car" may be a stretch limo, or it may be an itty bitty smart car, or even a good pair of walking shoes.

Ditto programming languages -- I'd say Python is best for learning and research in isolation, Matlab* is better if your community uses it more, and C++ with decent libraries is probably the best at the moment for fielding real solutions (and possibly even in research, because the solutions run much faster).

Tomorrow, if Rust takes off, it may be better than C++ -- but only if the image processing libraries keep up, and only if it's inherent safety doesn't slow things down too much.

* But really, Matlab should just die. Python + numpy + various image processing libraries allows well-structured code that can actually be sensibly worked on; Matlab (and Octave, and Scilab) is basically interpreted FORTRAN with various warts glued on.

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