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I want to work on co-frequency and co-time blind signals separation or carrier-in-carrier signal separation project. In articles published under the heading of blind separation of these signals, it is always assumed that one of the signals is known and the other signal is obtained by using that. I couldn't find an article in which both signals were unknown and separated. This has confused me. Is there anyone who has worked on this and guided me? Is there anyone who has worked on this and guided me?

Patent articles indicate that carrier-in-carrier separation is done by using adaptive filter. In this way, the received signal (which is the sum of the first and second signals) enters the filter with one of them and by subtracting it from the received signal, another signal is obtained. Some articles have also pointed out that if the power difference between the two signals is significant, the second signal is obtained by using a trick.

However, various articles have suggested that if the power difference between the two signals is 0 dB, it is possible to obtain both signals blindly and without any of them. Is such a claim true?

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    $\begingroup$ I had commented on the previous question by you on this topic, let me know if you are interested along the lines of my answer to that question. I can try and help $\endgroup$ – Dsp guy sam Apr 19 at 11:00
  • $\begingroup$ My question is how separate two signals when energy ratio between them can be as low as 0 dB. $\endgroup$ – Angelina ha Apr 19 at 11:04
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    $\begingroup$ Adding the links to the patent and articles would be helpful. $\endgroup$ – Engineer Apr 19 at 14:34
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    $\begingroup$ From your description of the adaptive filter approach, I believe the receiver would know one of the signals then the filter uses that as its desired output. If you had a tone signal in your signal of interest's band, then the filter would adapt best it could to notch at the frequency of the tone. That is my best guess, but even that requires knowledge of one signal so I'd want to read the article. $\endgroup$ – Engineer Apr 19 at 14:40
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    $\begingroup$ @angelina, how do you define co- frequency and co-time? $\endgroup$ – Dsp guy sam Apr 19 at 20:51
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This reference could be useful for blind equalization of CiC Signals

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  • $\begingroup$ Welcome to Signal Processing! Whilst this may theoretically answer the question, it would be preferable to include the essential parts of the answer here, and provide the link for reference. $\endgroup$ – Glorfindel May 15 at 11:00

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