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Please kindly recommend a signal processing book that explains basic concepts of signal processing in simple words(easy manner) and with minimum mathematics?

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  • $\begingroup$ What are you trying to get out of learning the basic concepts? Is it for a project or class or just because you're interested? $\endgroup$ – Engineer Mar 3 at 13:44
  • $\begingroup$ @Engineer I am interested in image processing but i am electrionics engineer by profession and education and i couldn't study image processing in my undergrad and first i want to polish my DSP skils then move on to image processing $\endgroup$ – engr Mar 3 at 16:48
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    $\begingroup$ I think you should just find an image processing book. They will have some intro chapters doing a review of DSP tools needed for image processing since not everything in a DSP book would be applicable $\endgroup$ – Engineer Mar 3 at 21:01
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You can't escape understanding some basic calculus stuff to understand the concept of fourier transform and DTFT.

And if you want to understand statistical DSP you need to understand probability, and linear algebra is so widely used you really need to understand that.

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    $\begingroup$ I haven't said"no math",instead i have said minimum math $\endgroup$ – engr Mar 3 at 5:37
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    $\begingroup$ dspguide.com/pdfbook.htm $\endgroup$ – FourierFlux Mar 3 at 5:38
  • $\begingroup$ Since this has been dredged up, I thought I'd comment. I strongly disagree with your opening statement. Neither the DFT, nor its generalization the DTFT, are Calculus based in any way shape or form. Take it from a former Calculus TA. $\endgroup$ – Cedron Dawg Sep 4 at 20:01
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My book "Understanding Digital Signal Processing" introduces the mathematics of DSP in a gentle and illuminating way. Each math equation is explained in understandable text. My book does not choke the reader to death with algebra. Steven Smith's terrific "The Scientist and Engineer's Guide to Digital Signal Processing" book is modest in its mathematical intensity. (See the above link posted by FourierFlux.) For a DSP book with the absolute minimum of mathematics, see "The Essential Guide to Digital Signal Processing" by Lyons and Fugal.

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Understanding Digital Signal Processing from Lyons

Signal Processing First from McClellan

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  • $\begingroup$ Hi. If you have a copy of my "Understanding DSP" textbook I wonder if you have visited the web page at: dsprelated.com/showarticle/1094.php $\endgroup$ – Richard Lyons Mar 3 at 11:48
  • $\begingroup$ @RichardLyons Hi mr. Lyons. I can access the book through library, but I haven't visited the associated link for errata yet. Thanks for notifying. $\endgroup$ – Fat32 Mar 3 at 22:10
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Some video lectures, books (Analyzing neural time series data) from Mike x Cohen are good resources to learn Signal Processing. He also gives and explains Matlab examples. You can check it out here: https://www.mikexcohen.com/

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Bores signal processing basics website gives a very short and crisp understanding of signal processing. You could read books by Steven Smith and Alan Oppenheim for broader understanding.

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This is an introductory book. Do not expect to be an expert after reading this. On the other hand this book gives you a very very gentle introduction to DSP. Comes with a git repo with all examples too.

https://greenteapress.com/wp/think-dsp/

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