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Is there any relation between impulse response and Region of convergence?Means position/location of ROC depends upon impulse response or not??

Please kindly guide about cases for both continuous and discrete time?

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  • $\begingroup$ There is connection between transforms of the impulse response and their ROC and the corresponding impulse response. Are we talking about discrete time or continuous time? $\endgroup$ – GKH Feb 24 at 16:35
  • $\begingroup$ "the corresponding impulse response" which impulse response is this?? $\endgroup$ – engr Feb 24 at 16:52
  • $\begingroup$ I mean, an impulse response has a transform, a represenation in another domain (complex frequency, in general). The ROC of the transform is connected to the form of the impulse response. $\endgroup$ – GKH Feb 24 at 19:46
  • $\begingroup$ Are you looking for something specific? A rather complete answer to your question can be given by these two links: pilot.cnxproject.org/content/collection/col10064/latest/module/… pilot.cnxproject.org/content/collection/col10064/latest/module/… $\endgroup$ – GKH Feb 24 at 19:53
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For a discrete-time system if the impulse response is IIR and right sided, then the ROC will be outside of the largest pole. Else if the impulse response is IIR and left sided, then the ROC will be inside of the smallest pole.

For all FIR (finite inpulse response) systems, the ROC will be all $z$ except possibly zero and/or infinity.

For the continuous-time systems, for right sided impulse responses, the ROC will be to the right (half plane) of the max pole, and for left sided impulse responses it will be to the left of the minimum pole.

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  • $\begingroup$ "For all FIR (finite inpulse response) systems, the ROC will be all z except possibly zero or infinity." your last words,they are "zero and infinity" or "zero or infinity"?? $\endgroup$ – engr Feb 25 at 5:13
  • $\begingroup$ @engr actually and/or ... $\endgroup$ – Fat32 Feb 25 at 9:12

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