0
$\begingroup$

All we know that we can not use the probe for measuring the high-frequency signal (microwave signals). I still can not understand the reason. I have read that the reason because of the wavelength size of the microwave signals is comparable to the electronic components, but this does not make any sense to me as the wavelength of the 1GHz is about 20 cm which is already comparable to the size of the electronic components.

Could any of you please explain to me in more details why we can not use the probe for measuring the high-frequency signal.

$\endgroup$
  • $\begingroup$ electronics se is the correct place to ask this I think... $\endgroup$ – Fat32 Nov 26 '19 at 14:05
2
$\begingroup$

Not sure to understand what you are asking, Microwaves wavelengths range between 300 MHz (1 m) and 300 GHz (1 mm) which is indeed of the same order of magnitude as the probe.

1GHz corresponds to a wavelengths of about 30 cm and is also in the Microwave range.

Are you saying that it is possible to measure a frequency of 1GHz with a probe while it is usually said that Microwaves can't be measured with it?

$\endgroup$
0
$\begingroup$

Yes high frequency signals are harder to deal with due to their small wavelengths resulting in non-lumped circuit behaviour. But even circuits operating at 2.4 GHz (such as a wi-fi receiver-transmitter) are being analysed by properly designed oscilloscopes.

1 GHz is even within the range of terrestrial TV broadcast signals and ordinary oscilloscopes with sufficient bandwidth will be able to monitor them. Of course their designs should incorporate high frequency effects nevertheless.

$\endgroup$

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.