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I want to ask the definition of MIMO(Multi-input Multi-output )

If there are one transmitter and one receiver,each of them has $N$ antennas,$N >1$. So i can say it is a MIMO system.

But if now i have one transmitter with $N$ antennas,$N >1$.And $5$ receivers with single antennas for each,can this still be called MIMO?

I think it should be called MISO,because each receiver just has only one antenna.However,in this paper,it called this system "MIMO" system .

Paper:https://arxiv.org/pdf/1903.05758.pdf enter image description here

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  • $\begingroup$ If you look at the system as a whole, it's probably more accurate to call it MIMO. $\endgroup$ – BlackMath Jul 18 at 6:57
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I want to ask the definition of MIMO(Multi-input Multi-output ) If there are one transmitter and one receiver,each of them has N antennas,N>1. So i can say it is a MIMO system.

Any communication system comprising of a transmitter with $N >1$ and receiver comprising of $M>1$ antennas is considered to be a MIMO system. So, this is not only limited to $N=M$ in the way you describe it.

I think it should be called MISO,because each transmitter just has only one antenna.

No, I think it should be called MU-MISO (MultiUser MISO) because it's what it is; you're transmitting to multiple users (each with a single antenna).

However,in this paper,it called this system "MIMO" system.

In some applications, MU-MISO and MU-SIMO are seen as MIMO.

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