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Say we have a square wave and its Fourier series. When the wave doesn't jump, its oscillators aren't aligned:

But if they are aligned, the wave will jump:

What is this moment called? They might not be necessary in the same angle, and I don't think "resonating together" is correct, since they have different frequencies. What is it called when all oscillators aligned to make a jump?


Meta discussion: Why are questions asking for terms off-topic?

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  • $\begingroup$ Coincidence of zero crossings and same sign of derivation? $\endgroup$ – Max Mar 20 '18 at 9:45
  • $\begingroup$ too long........... $\endgroup$ – Ooker Mar 20 '18 at 10:49
  • $\begingroup$ Try searching on "gibbs phenomenon". Those are the little squiggles you see on the flat part of your square wave. $\endgroup$ – Cedron Dawg Mar 20 '18 at 12:04
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Phasor Alignment : The individual frequency component phasors of the square wave are aligning, but I don't think this is a well-defined (or previously-defined) term.

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I think the word/phrase you are looking for is "discontinuity" / "discontinuity in the source signal". Although a jump is always a discontinuity, a discontinuity is not always a jump. When it isn't a jump, it is known as a pluggable discontinuity, i.e. you can define a value to plug a hole. The sinc function at zero is an example of this. So to be more specific you would say "an unpluggable discontinuity".

Whether a series of continuous functions could converge to a discontinuous function was a question that led to some very serious, and non-intuitive, math.

As far as I know, there is no word to describe the state of the components at this moment. The closest word I can think of is a secondary meaning of "concordance" = "agreement".

Hope this helps.

Ced

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  • $\begingroup$ I find out that the term is actually removable discontinuity. But yes, I'm looking for a word of the state of the components. If you think there is no word for this, I think this question is better suited in English Language & Usage $\endgroup$ – Ooker Mar 20 '18 at 12:05
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It is the time of maximum constructive interference of the derivatives of the harmonics. That's a physics term, but widely known.

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One can simply say the oscillators are in sync, or synchronized. Some other synonyms of the synchronization in English are: conjunction co-occurrence, concurrence, coincidence, coexistence, simultaneity, contemporaneity, concomitance, synchronicity, synchrony

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