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I can hear 12kHz sinewave but not 22kHz.

A 12kHz squarewave has the fundamental and harmonics I think. But the first harmonic is outside my hearing range, so how come I can hear the difference between 12kHz sine and 12kHz square? It's a long time since I did any audio electronics so I've probably forgotten some basic rules - cut me some slack!

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    $\begingroup$ How did you generate the square wave? Could the tonal difference be caused by aliasing? $\endgroup$ – applesoup Feb 25 '18 at 9:41
  • $\begingroup$ I just tried it here and cannot hear a difference. May the fact that you can also be related to different levels of the fundamental tones? $\endgroup$ – applesoup Feb 25 '18 at 9:46
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Try synthesizing your “square wave” using only sinusoidal components below half the sample rate. Otherwise, most of the infinite train of odd harmonics can alias to some other (lower) frequency in the sampled data.

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As pointed in the above answer, it might be due to aliasing. What is your sampling frequency? You can figure out what components could be causing you to differentiate between the two.

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