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I have a single channel audio recording. I want to simulate the stereo recording when it is (hypothetically) played on a speaker in front of stereo mics (distance between them - say 10 cm).

Are there any tools which can do this?

Edit- I am looking for something more precise - as in for specific distance between speaker and mics and also for given room dimensions. I tried Audacity 'Reverb tool' which sort of does stereofication but there is no way to specify certain distances (speaker-mic, mic-mic etc.)

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  • $\begingroup$ If my answer is not the answer you want... Edit your question for better answers otherwise can you accept my answer? $\endgroup$ – Jan-Bert Jan 8 '16 at 18:40
  • $\begingroup$ @Jan-Bert thanks for answer but I did not find what I was looking for. I was looking for something more precise - as in for specific distance between speaker and mics and also for given room dimensions. I tried Audacity 'Reverb tool' which sort of does stereofication but there is no way to specify certain distances (speaker-mic, mic-mic etc.) $\endgroup$ – user13107 Jan 12 '16 at 1:35
  • $\begingroup$ I think the reason for that is the way of working of sound engineers etc. A sound engineer want a result not a method or physically correct model. Let explain me with a sample measurement: What is your environment? Free Field_(No reflections)_; Near Field_(close distance particles not in phase)_; far field_(6dB damping double distance)_, direct field_(just sound from source)_ and reverberant field_(reflections of your room)_ What is the shape of the room? square; round; dome; horse shoe; etc What is the size of the room? (see environment) $\endgroup$ – Jan-Bert Jan 12 '16 at 9:33
  • $\begingroup$ What materials are used in the room? wood; stone. are the materials soft; hard; flat or course? Is the room filled with products/ materials/ shapes etc. Where is the mic placed? This means a lot of options. In sound engineering they try to fix this amount of parameters to replace with less. The parameters they use are: size; shape; early reflection (distance mic from speaker) ; decay/reverb time; damping; filter options; mix(direct sound vs reverb); etc $\endgroup$ – Jan-Bert Jan 12 '16 at 9:36
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Check a music production software (commercial: Logic/ Ableton/ Pro Tools. Open Source: Ardour, Mu Lab) or otherwise audacity. Add a stereo widening tool plugin. For that check KVR Audio
stereo/ imaging/ widening
stereo imaging more close search

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