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I am trying to compare audio waveform from input waveform (A) to preset waveform (B)from in the device.

I try to lookup everywhere. Most likely someone give such a source code as follow :

    function compireAudio(){  
    var audio1 =    "http://soundjax.com/reddo/86502%5Ealarm.mp3";  
    var audio2 =    "http://soundjax.com/reddo/44368%5EALARME.mp3"; 
    var i,j,d; 
    var matching = 0; 
    var t = 0;
    var i,j,d; 
    var matching = 0; 
    var t = 0; 
    var audio1Arr = Array(); 
    var audio1Len = audio1.length; 
    for (i = 1; i<=audio1Len; i++) {
        //reverse so its like a stack
        d = audio1.charCodeAt(audio1Len-i);
        for (j = 0; j < 8; j++) 
        {
            audio1Arr.push(d%2);
            d = Math.floor(d/2);
        } 
     }
     var audio2Len = audio2.length; 
     for (i = 1; i<=audio2Len; i++) {
       //reverse so its like a stack
       d = audio2.charCodeAt(audio2Len-i);
       for (j = 0; j < 8; j++) 
       {
         if(d%2 == audio1Arr[t])
         {
             matching++;
         }
         d = Math.floor(d/2);
         t++;
       }  
     }
   var avarage = Number(matching)/((Number(t)+Number(audio1Arr.length))/Number(2))*Number(100);
    alert('The Matching with the two audio is '+avarage+' %.');

And most people said this is not correct because it compare the stream instead of the audio content.

Anyway, I have think of compare every samples after normalization (ensure that amplitude is not a factor here). However, a phase is another problem here.

I have solution is cross-correlation between A and B and find the biggest convolution as output. In this case, they should be in same phase.

In short. WAS Question is What are the common methods for two waveform comparison ?

UPDATE Maybe I should ask What are the common characteristic of a audio waveform for comparing audio waveform ?

P.S. I read this Question and answer. The bottom method seems work, but the comment said No.

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  • $\begingroup$ Cross correlation is the way to go if you know the signals are reasonably identical in terms of tempo. If not, you need to use techniques that are much more sophisticated. $\endgroup$ – Daniel R Hicks Jun 5 '12 at 11:28
  • $\begingroup$ To Martin : Interesting edit but WITHOUT comment !!! And removed the tag for the coding. Really interesting BUT MEANINGLESS ! I do hope people follow rules on stackoverflow. Thanks a lot. $\endgroup$ – Ken Hui Jun 6 '12 at 0:55
  • $\begingroup$ And please tell me about the vote down. I don't know why people try to discourage others to learn.I am fool and hungry on signal processing ! $\endgroup$ – Ken Hui Jun 6 '12 at 1:24
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    $\begingroup$ Please describe your application -- WHY do you want to compare two inputs? Also, what would be the sources of the two inputs? This will help people understand what features you need. $\endgroup$ – Daniel R Hicks Jun 6 '12 at 2:30
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    $\begingroup$ Will the singer be, eg, listening to the original with headphones? Or singing to the same pre-recorded instrumental track as the original singer? If not, you need a MUCH more sophisticated algorithm to handle tempo differences. In any event you've got a non-trivial task. $\endgroup$ – Daniel R Hicks Jun 6 '12 at 10:59
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Please update your question to mention which kind of comparison you want to perform. You seem to want your comparison to be robust to amplitude changes and time delays, but what about:

  • Audio coding. Should a signal and a MP3 version of itself be considered as similar or different?
  • EQ and filtering. Should a signal and the same signal with the high frequencies shifted by 10° be considered similar or different?
  • Dynamics change. Does applying a time-varying gain factor to one signal make it different from the original?
  • Time and pitch shifting. Should a signal and a slightly accelerated version of itself be considered as similar or different?
  • Noise and recording conditions. Should two versions of the same signal recorded on different equipment, microphone type, etc. be considered as similar or different?
  • Timbre. Should two versions of the same melody played by two different instruments be considered as similar or different?

Depending on your application (assessing degradations through a signal processing chain, identifying copyrighted work in an audio stream, shazam-like song identification, plagiarism detection on music...), you might want your comparison to be robust to some of these transformations.

Your approach consisting in normalizing the signals is not very robust. If you have two identical signals $x$ and $y(t)$, and if you change $x(0) = 2 \max_t y(t)$, the normalized version of $x$ is twice smaller than the normalized version $y$ and the comparison will fail.

Using cross-correlation to look for a time delay is a sound approach.

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  • $\begingroup$ Thanks for replying. I update the question to be more specific that I donno wt's the characteristic that audio waveform could be compare. For normalize part, I may convert them into dB first. It is because I would like to look into their waveform/ shape. $\endgroup$ – Ken Hui Jun 6 '12 at 1:22
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The target application is automatic singing evaluation.

Do you want this to recognize that the lyrics are sung correctly? If not (you don't mind if the people is singing meaningless words, humming, whistling), the only thing that is worth being compared is the pitch contour - you can extract that and ditch all the other information from the waveform.

A simple system would at least do the following steps:

  • Break down your signal into short frames (20 or 50 ms), use a pitch extractor such as YIN to extract the pitch of the reference signal (good singing), and of the recorded signal.

  • Look for the optimal shift in pitch to account for the fact that people might sing one octave above or below the original, and shift the recorded pitch sequence by this. You don't want to penalize a female singer for singing one octave above the original song.

  • Align the two sequences using DTW. How much the DTW path deviates from a straight line give you the rhythmic accuracy ; the total DTW distance after alignment gives you the overall pitch accuracy.

  • You can also get an objective quality metric, which doesn't require an original recording, by measuring the average distance between the pitch contour and the nearest pitch on the tempered scale.

  • You can also give "stylistic" bonus points by detecting vibrato (is there a steady sinusoidal modulation of the pitch contour on held notes)...

These techniques are well-known in the MIR community - and companies like BMAT or Voxler already have commercial SDKs for doing this.

For recognizing lyrics, the most basic solution would consist in extracting a sequence of MFCC from the original ; a sequence of MFCC from the recorded performance, then finding the MFCC transform matrix that minimizes the DTW distance between the two sequences (to account for voice timbre difference - aka Vocal Tract Length Normalization) ; and use this minimal DTW distance as a "lyrics similarity" score.

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  • $\begingroup$ Thank you very much. Let me give a try. And I think you and Daniel are thinking too much. I just want to compare a single note. Yes a single note like "do" , "ri", "mi". Pitch is only allow them to know they are at right frequency. A bad sing could have right frequency. Thats why it is required to compare its waveform too. $\endgroup$ – Ken Hui Jun 6 '12 at 13:38
  • $\begingroup$ Could you clarify "a bad sing could have right frequency"? I do think that what you want to compare is the pitch. If there's only a single note, then extra the pitch for each frame, take the median, and compare to the target note. You don't care about loudness, timbre, dynamics... Especially singing "Do" at 440 Hz doesn't qualify as singing a good C. $\endgroup$ – pichenettes Jun 6 '12 at 13:59

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