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I am an auto didactic Electrical Engineer currently pursuing a goal to design a custom application targeted at deeply embedded linux(think BBB or even Raspberrypi-2) type device. My DSP background is mostly theoretical and dates back to my college days. I am currently referring to Understanding Digital Signal Processing- Richard Lyons. A tome it definitely is, but is a very basic reference at the best. I want more concrete book/reference material that helps me understand the various algorithms, their trade-offs and implementation details(pseudo code or Matlab code would definitely help me save time). For a beginner such as me who has no industry bearings, terms such as YIN,YAPPT,HPS,Cepstrum,ASDF,AMDF and many more TLAs are mere jargons. I want to do a deep dive with whatever DSP basics i have and complement that with the said reference book.

My plan is to investigate several algorithms, simulate them in Matlab to verify results and after selecting one based on the results of my experiments move on to actual implementation. My end requirement is that the Algorithm has to be real-time. I basically want to hook up a Beaglebone black to my son's piano and be able to detect Pitch and onset in real-time. I have been reading some interesting questions posted here and elsewhere.But I need a strong footing on Psychoacoustics before any of it starts making sense to me.

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    $\begingroup$ I'm leaving this open for now, but there is a call for closing it due to being too broad. If you're interested in music DSP, I'd suggest having a look at J. O. Smith III's "Physical Audio Signal Processing". It's freely available online: ccrma.stanford.edu/~jos/pasp $\endgroup$ – Peter K. May 12 '15 at 7:57
  • $\begingroup$ @PeterK Yes. I will certainly take a look. The CCRMA website contains a wealth of information including JOS free books on Audio DSP. $\endgroup$ – ultrasounder May 12 '15 at 16:45
  • $\begingroup$ I also found this book on Amazon while searching for cepstrum techniques and thought might leave it here for others who are looking for similar information. It has book chapters authored by JOS and Judith Brown(constant Q transform) among others.Analysis, Synthesis, and Perception of Musical Sounds: The Sound of Music (Modern Acoustics and Signal Processing) $\endgroup$ – ultrasounder May 12 '15 at 16:48
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The Fastl-Zwicker book is usually the introduction to this topic. The more I learn about it the more fascinating it becomes. If you pick it up used be sure to get one with the CD examples in it, as they are completely fascinating.

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Psychoacoustics is an incredibly broad topic. Are you interested in localization, pitch models, loudness? Hearing disorders? There are a number of good references I consulted during my PhD focused on psychoacoustics, namely median plane localization and head tracking. My advisor was Jens Blauert's advisee so I am a bit biased when I recommend his works (although by any standard they are authoritative).

Spatial Hearing - Jens Blauert http://www.amazon.com/Spatial-Hearing-Revised-Psychophysics-Localization/dp/0262024136/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1431457038&sr=8-1&keywords=spatial+hearing

Brian Moore - The Psychology of Hearing http://www.amazon.com/An-Introduction-Psychology-Hearing-Edition/dp/9004252428/ref=pd_bxgy_14_text_y

Zwicker and Fastl -- Psychoacoustics: Facts and Models http://www.amazon.com/Psychoacoustics-Models-Springer-Information-Sciences/dp/3540231595/ref=sr_1_2?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1431457567&sr=1-2&keywords=psychoacoustics

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  • $\begingroup$ purely interested in pitch detection, tracking and beat/onset detection. I want to implement them using one of the several existing algorithms but I want a clear explanation of the various techniques and the relative merits and demerits for me to make a prudent choice. I understand that these algors are not one size fits all, so would like to choose something that works the best for stringed instruments such as guitar and piano. $\endgroup$ – ultrasounder May 13 '15 at 14:19

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