1
$\begingroup$

How are Radix-8 and Radix-2^3 FFT are related?

Are they same?

I got some more details in IEEE paper by S.He and M. Torkelson, "Designing pipeline FFT processor for OFDM (de)modulation," in Proc. Int. Symp. Signals, Syst., 1998, pp. 257-262.

FFT Radix 2^3 has complexity of radix 8 but has a structure as that of radix-2.

$\endgroup$
  • $\begingroup$ I would think so. Can you provide a reference for the "Radix-2^3 FFT"? $\endgroup$ – Deve Apr 2 '14 at 7:53
  • $\begingroup$ I got some more details in IEEE paper by S.He and M. Torkelson, "Designing pipeline FFT processor for OFDM (de)modulation," in Proc. Int. Symp. Signals, Syst., 1998, pp. 257-262. FFT Radix 2^3 has complexity of radix 8 but has a structure as that of radix-2. $\endgroup$ – Amey Naik Apr 3 '14 at 15:09
4
$\begingroup$

Radix-2^3 is a special class of radix-2 algorithms where the basic decomposition is based on radix-8 and the 8-point DFTs are later on decomposed into radix-2, leading to an algorithm based on radix-2 butterflies.

"Same" depends on what you mean and how you classify algorithms. In some sense, a valid way to implement a radix-8 butterfly is to decompose it into radix-2 butterflies. Still, using classic definitions, the size of the fundamental butterfly operation that is realized determines the radix, leading to that radix-8 and radix-2^3 are "different".

$\endgroup$

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.