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What are the most common and best topological skeleton matching techniques?

Suppose I have skeletonized object and corresponding 2D model of this object. What are the next steps to match pattern? What are skeleton descriptors?

If someone could give code examples, reference to some open source projects using skeletonization and matching I would be grateful.

I want a method that will work also when skeleton is lack of some part of it due to bad object detection, but any suggestions are appreciated.

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    $\begingroup$ Would appreciate that you specify what the skeleton here is and add images or references related your application would help us understand this question more clearly. $\endgroup$ – Dipan Mehta Feb 22 '12 at 14:32
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    $\begingroup$ I think this site (unlike Stack Overflow) doesn't quite appreciate if people simply ask for code example. If you want to discuss theory/algorithm it is a better place. $\endgroup$ – Dipan Mehta Feb 22 '12 at 14:34
  • $\begingroup$ Ok I am just trying to make some theoretical background with no specialized applications. So algorithms will be good for this stage, by code samples I thought rater about some path to go. $\endgroup$ – krzych Feb 22 '12 at 17:50
  • $\begingroup$ What is the application? can you throw some light on what type of images / skeleton will they be? E.g. are these human skeleton or something? $\endgroup$ – Dipan Mehta Feb 22 '12 at 18:49
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    $\begingroup$ Do you mean topological skeleton? And is the model in 2D or 3D? $\endgroup$ – Geerten Feb 23 '12 at 10:27
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I think you should look/google in the direction of graph matching.

This is because you can represent your skeleton as a graph by creating nodes at endpoints and crossings, and creating edges for the connected endpoints and crossings. There is much more research done in the direction of graph matching than just topological skeleton matching. However for the latter I found this paper, which you might find interesting.

You can also look through the references of the Wikipedia page of Topological skeletonization, there are also some references about matching skeletons.

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