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Can you please help me with this problem??

I have been working on AM335x sitara evm and my project needs self diagnosis of the captured audio from the mic through the speaker on the same board (we have re-worked on the evm to add the mic and speaker). In the application it is preferred that the user only requests for the audio test to be performed and the software (have to implement; but no Idea how to do so) need to check the quality of the audio and based on the statistics it has to give the test result.

Please provide me some ideas how to implement this self diagnosis test for audio quality. If you feel the question is unclear or could not understand please let me know.....

Regards, G.Shricharan

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  • $\begingroup$ A standard metric for audio quality is called SINAD which is the ratio of signal to noise plus distortion. It should be higher than 12 dB as a general rule. $\endgroup$ – John Feb 10 '14 at 22:43
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It appears that you want to play a tone, record it, and then measure how the signal was degraded. That is certainly possible, however it would then not be clear if any problem is in the speaker or in the microphone. If you can rely on that the speaker is identical, this could be circumvented.

Generally, you'd want to find a ,,characteristic'' of the microphone. You could describe the transfer function, it would be the (pointwise) ratio of the fft of the two signals. You could play back pulses, then the postprocessing would be easier. However it's not trivial to cancel out the speakers characteristic.

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A good measure of the audio quality if it is speech that you want to quantify is PESQ (perceptual evaluation of speech quality) this a MATLAB link that provides the code for the evaluation

http://www.mathworks.com/matlabcentral/fileexchange/30815-phase-spectrum-compensation/content/psc/pesq.m

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