2 added 369 characters in body
source | link

I'm taking an online image and signals class and the structure is absolutely horrible.

I'm wondering if you can provide me hints, or tips to solving the below question. I'm not looking for an answer, because I'd actually like to learn something! The structure of the class is just not conducive to learning as they just point us to online resources without any real "teaching."

Consider a basketball being dribbled. If the height of the basketball can be described by a sine wave of maximum height 2h, average height h and minimum height 0, and the ball hits the ground once per second, how fast would a video camera have to sample the dribbling to extract its frequency? What happens to the frequency estimate if the sampling rate is too low?

So just thinking out loud... the ball is bouncing at a rate of $1\frac{bounce}{sec}$, which from my reading tells me the frequency is just the inverse of this, so $1\frac{sec}{bounce}$.

I don't understand, though, how to extract how fast a video camera would need to sample this to extract its frequency as it seems like I already have the frequency.

I'm taking an online image and signals class and the structure is absolutely horrible.

I'm wondering if you can provide me hints, or tips to solving the below question. I'm not looking for an answer, because I'd actually like to learn something! The structure of the class is just not conducive to learning as they just point us to online resources without any real "teaching."

Consider a basketball being dribbled. If the height of the basketball can be described by a sine wave of maximum height 2h, average height h and minimum height 0, and the ball hits the ground once per second, how fast would a video camera have to sample the dribbling to extract its frequency? What happens to the frequency estimate if the sampling rate is too low?

I'm taking an online image and signals class and the structure is absolutely horrible.

I'm wondering if you can provide me hints, or tips to solving the below question. I'm not looking for an answer, because I'd actually like to learn something! The structure of the class is just not conducive to learning as they just point us to online resources without any real "teaching."

Consider a basketball being dribbled. If the height of the basketball can be described by a sine wave of maximum height 2h, average height h and minimum height 0, and the ball hits the ground once per second, how fast would a video camera have to sample the dribbling to extract its frequency? What happens to the frequency estimate if the sampling rate is too low?

So just thinking out loud... the ball is bouncing at a rate of $1\frac{bounce}{sec}$, which from my reading tells me the frequency is just the inverse of this, so $1\frac{sec}{bounce}$.

I don't understand, though, how to extract how fast a video camera would need to sample this to extract its frequency as it seems like I already have the frequency.

1
source | link

Capturing the sampling rate from a basketball being dribbled

I'm taking an online image and signals class and the structure is absolutely horrible.

I'm wondering if you can provide me hints, or tips to solving the below question. I'm not looking for an answer, because I'd actually like to learn something! The structure of the class is just not conducive to learning as they just point us to online resources without any real "teaching."

Consider a basketball being dribbled. If the height of the basketball can be described by a sine wave of maximum height 2h, average height h and minimum height 0, and the ball hits the ground once per second, how fast would a video camera have to sample the dribbling to extract its frequency? What happens to the frequency estimate if the sampling rate is too low?